Tag Archive: Crowdsourcing

Jun 26 2017

Topic Modelling – Letters of 1916

Letters of 1916 is a public humanities project run by Maynooth University and directed by Professor Susan Schreibman. The project is creating a crowd-sourced digital collection of letters written between 1st November 1915 and 31st October 1916. For my internship, I have been working on the project as a research assistant, analysing the collection. One …

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Dec 18 2015

Outreach: Letters of 1916 – What lies beneath

An ongoing social media presence is an important part of many crowdsourced humanities projects. This can be used to promote the project, engage a wider range of contributors and provide a channel for collaboration between academics and other interested parties. Planning and Hosting a Twitter Chat Leading on from my previous blog post which explored …

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Oct 26 2015

Letters of 1916 – The Role of Twitter

The Letters of 1916 project is the first public humanities project in Ireland. Its purpose is to provide a snapshot of ‘a year in a life’ in Ireland between 1st November 1915 and 31st October 1916. This is a period which covers the 1916 Rising as well as several major events in World War I …

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Jul 10 2015

Marine Lives – R and The Silver Ships – Frequencies

In this second blog post on the Marine Lives Three Silver Ships project, (see the first post here) I look at how to identify the folio pages in the HCA 13/70 Depositions which mention the three ships (Salvador, Sampson and Saint George). Processing and Calculating Raw Frequencies Using the .txt file downloaded in the last …

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Oct 11 2014

Crowdsourcing – the ‘Ancient Lives’ Project

Crowdsourcing The term ‘crowdsourcing’ was first used by Jeff Howe in a Wired Magazine article, the word itself a portmanteau of outsourcing and crowd. Initially, the term focused on the business world and had connotations of profit, outsourcing jobs and cheap labour.   The term has been increasingly repurposed by cultural heritage and citizen science, …

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